Elbow Joint Pain and Tennis Elbow

Tennis Elbow Affects Millions But It Can Be Beaten

Tennis is a physical sport. Running, jumping, swinging, and sometimes diving on the hard court; like any sport, there are many ways that tennis players can incur an injury.

There are noninvasive medical options that can address the pain of this condition as well. Anti-inflammatory drugs are used to combat both pain and inflammation. If a regimen of anti-inflammatory drugs is not successful, cortisone injections are an option that has proven successful for some patients.

While tennis elbow, known medically as lateral epicondylitis, is not limited to tennis players, it is estimated that one-third of all tennis players will experience the condition at some point in their lives. Anyone who engages in lifting at the elbow, or repetitive movements of the elbow and wrist, is likely to be susceptible to this condition, so naturally, tennis players are at high risk.

Elbow Pain

So how do you know you have tennis elbow and not some other painful condition? Individuals with this ailment typically feel pain on the outside of their elbow, especially when grabbing an object and cocking back the wrist. The pain is generally more severe when lifting something – although pain while resting should be expected – and it is often described as a pain that radiates down the forearm. The pain from tennis elbow generally starts gradually, although it has been known to have a sudden onset as well.

Sadly, if the aforementioned treatment options are not successful then surgery may be the only road to relief. The good news is that surgery has a very high rate of success, and it is only required in a small percentage of patients.

However, injections are not always successful and if relief does not come quickly then you are likely not going to be served by continued injections. However, medication is not the only avenue that one can explore when trying to alleviate pain and discomfort in the elbow region. Use of an elbow brace can reduce the strain placed on the elbow during the tennis stroke.

The cause of pain from this condition is not a medical certainty, although it is believed that it is caused by small tears of the tendons attaching the forearm muscles to the bone at the elbow joint. It is the muscles of the forearm that are used to cock the wrist back – extensor carpi radialis brevis – that are the suspected culprits in this condition.

If you believe that you are suffering from tennis elbow you should consult with your physician immediately. Treatment for this condition is typically noninvasive, and over 90% of patients are successfully treated without surgery. Tennis players can often address the problem through some subtle changes in their equipment and technique.

A good first step is to make sure that you are using a racket with a properly sized grip. Another option is to reduce the tension on your racket strings. That reduction in string tension will soften the impact of the ball, and reduce twisting of the forearm during off-center hits. Lastly, changing your actual tennis stroke can help reduce the negative impacts on your elbow as well. Players who learn to swing without leading the racket with their elbow in a flexed position can often alleviate much of the condition and reduce the likelihood of reoccurrence.

Elbow Joint Pain and Tennis elbow post built with assistance from Spin Rewriter https://www.spinrewriter.com/?ref=22739

Lisa

lisa@injuryanprevention.com

Golf Injury Prevention

Golf Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention

Do you have to be in shape to play golf?

Golfer Pixabay-skeeze

Golfer Pixabay-Skeeze

There’s belief that one doesn’t have to be in shape to be a good golfer. Such portly individuals perpetuate as Craig Stadler and John Daly (Both weighing in at a modest 300 pounds. Maybe they were sumo-aspirants at one point?) who go on to win tournaments despite the invasion of Paunch DeLeon they have going on around their midsections. These two and others like them are the exception, not the rule, and I guarantee you they would be better players if they were in better shape. Not to mention they would be able to play longer.

How to Do It

The goal is to prevent Musculoskeletal Injuries.

There’s more to fitness than taking a club made of lead and swinging it over and over. To be properly conditioned one must focus on three things: strength, stamina, and flexibility. For power, you need strength. You Need Strenght, to make it all the way to the 18th hole. And to have great technique, a golfer must be flexible. It works for Tiger Woods, and it can work for you, too!

 

The Products to Help:

Secrets To A Powerful Golf

DVD
• Get Stronger
• Increase Your Stamina
• Hit your drives 20,30 even 40 yards longer

I’ve been golfing for over 20 years, and thankfully have never had an injury keep me down. I’m not getting any younger, however, and I’ve become more focused on golf fitness as a result. Two products have helped me get closer to my goals and are available to others in the fitness section: Roger Frederick’s Stretching and Flexibility on DVD, and the Golf Gym. Both are fantastic at improving your overall conditioning, and the Golf Gym even helped Pat Perez win the Bob Hope Tour! That sort of endorsement you can’t beat with a stick (Or should I say club?).

Flexibility the Key.

As one can expect, flexibility is one of the first things to go in an individual, golfers included. Flexibility is key to a golfer’s performance. If you’re not limber enough to turn on the backswing correctly, then you’re in the pit without a sand wedge, my friend. Greater flexibility improves a golfer’s range of motion and allows for stronger muscles. These two attributes together help a golfer swing true consistently, allowing the player to put the ball where he wants it. It’s been shown that improving your strength and flexibility can add up to 20 yards of distance off the tee. That’s quite a difference!

Injuries:

Body movement limitation results in improper or modified swing models which could cause injuries,

Amazon-Momentus Ladies

Momentus Ladies Speed Whoosh Golf Swing Trainer with Training Grip

mainly back and neck pain, elbow and shoulder injuries. When a swing is performed repeatedly or executed improperly due to poor comprehension of the swing mechanics or physical constraints, injuries may occur. Golf related injuries may be a result of overuse, poor techniques, and poor physical fitness.

Serious about golf?

Get serious about golf fitness, then. Sure, you may be able to pull it off like some of our more rotund professionals out there whose idea of exercise is to dead-lift Krispy Kreme boxes. But, let’s just say that others have tried it against super heavyweight boxer ButterBean, thinking to beat him at his own game. The results weren’t pretty, and the odds of the same thing happening in golf are pretty high. Better your chances: think Tiger Woods, not Stadler the Waddler!

 

Golf Guru Guy is a Golf fanatic that eats, breathes and sleeps the game and it’s history. He has developed a Golfing Super Site to write about the golfing universe and identify and report on Great Golf Deals on the internet. His TODAY’s HOT DEALS section details daily specials and coupons while his Golf Guru Guy Blog on the site is chock full of great golf tips and articles about all things golf.